Rhubarb jam easy recipe

The instructions below keep it simple... no worrying about setting point, no shoving plates in freezers and little time spent standing over a boiling pan. And this is certainly the first fruit jam of the year to make... it'll be months yet before other fruit is ready. Why not try out some of the other Allotment Heaven easy recipes?

Typically the jam available in shops struggles to reach 30% or 40% fruit content so this recipe is especially fruity, with 66% rhubarb content... good enough to add to icecream or yoghurt as well as toast or scones. And it's so easy to make, it's daft not to!

This recipe makes about eight jars of jam.


Equipment needed
1. Suitable sized bowl and pan
2. Jam jars with sealable tops
3.Long handled spoon
4. Milton sterilising fluid
5. Oh, and a cooker hob ~:0)


Ingredients needed
1. Rhubarb, 4lbs (1.8kg), washed and with stringy bits removed
2. Granulated sugar, 2lbs (0.9kg)
3. Juice of two lemons


Method
1. Cut the rhubarb into 1in (2.5cm) cubes, place in a bowl, sprinkle with the sugar, cover and leave overnight.
2. Next day sterilise the jam jars by filling with diluted Milton liquid and place the jam jar tops in boiling water. As an alternative the jam jars can also be sterilised in boiling water.
3. Put the rhubarb and sugar in a pan and add the lemon juice.
4. Put on a gentle heat and stir to prevent burning until all the sugar has dissolved.
5. Turn up the heat; continuing to stir, boil for 15 mins.
6. Pour into jars, seal with lids and leave to cool.
7. Jars can be stored for many months, but once opened should be kept in a fridge.

40 comments:

  1. I did try the jam recipe and it turned out wonderful. I have never made rhubarb jam before. I was surprised at how easy it was. My husband used it on pancakes today and was very pleased. Thank you so much for the recipe. I will be mentioning it on my blog this week as I have included the jam in my tea post.
    Terri
    artfulaffirmations.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Appreciate the mention on your blog, Terri. I've eaten all my rhubarb jam some time ago, so looking forward to a fresh supply of its zingy taste soon.

      Thanks, John

      Delete
    2. Anonymous11:34 am

      Not sure if I've done this right I put sugar on rhubarb overnight, there was a lot of liquid in the morning... just put the whole lot on to boil with the lemon juice read I meant to use all the juice?

      Delete
    3. It does get a bit 'juicy', Terri. Use the whole lot to boil with the lemon juice. Regards, John

      Delete
  2. Any recipes for rhubarb wine please?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Carole... Here's a link to a good rhubarb wine recipe : http://www.lovelygreens.com/2012/04/rhubarb-wine-recipe.html

      Delete
  3. Anonymous7:11 am

    What happens if you dont cut off the stringy bites. Ive just picked my first rhubarb but cut the stems to 1 inch lengths and froze it without destring???

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Basil… Shouldn’t be a problem. Depending on how long you keep the rhubarb frozen, it’ll probably come out pretty soft. The boiling process softens all the rhubarb, including the stringy bits.

      Regards, John

      Delete
  4. Hi how many lemons are needed,is it 2 for4lbs of rhubarb?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Trixley... That's right, the juice of two lemons for each four pounds of rhubarb. Realised I've not made it particularly clear so I've updated the text to remove any doubt. Thanks for spotting the confusion. Regards, John

      Delete
  5. Anonymous1:54 pm

    I made the jam this week, but it is very liquidy and not what I would call 'set'. What have I done wrong, or is it supposed to be like this?
    SueA

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sue... It will be a little runnier than normal jams since there's no pectin artificially added. Next time I suggest you boil it a little longer. Sometimes depends on the water content of the rhubarb. Thanks, John

      Delete
    2. Michael9:18 pm

      Sue, I would suggest you use preserving sugar instead of granulated as it has added pectin.

      Delete
  6. How soon can you eat this jam please?, better with age?.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Maggie... You can eat the jam as soon as it cools and it's deliciously fruity. But if you can make enough to last for months you'll find it certainly improves with age. Thanks, John

      Delete
  7. Anonymous6:34 pm

    Nice, I added half a can of crushed pineapple for a bit of texture. Used jam sugar also.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Surprised you needed any texture... the rhubarb itself gives it enough body. Sounds an interesting variation, though. Regards, John

      Delete
  8. Anonymous5:47 pm

    Hello,I am going to make your rhubarb jam can I add root or stem ginger.Billy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Billy... I guess you can, but I've no idea how much to add since I've never tried adding ginger. Please add another comment once you've got the right amount to use, to guide other readers. Thanks, John

      Delete
  9. Hi

    I've just made a batch of rhubarb and ginger jam and its delicious- simply add about three or four pieces of stem ginger(finely chopped) to your rhubarb and sugar mix and cook in the usual way- it adds a real zing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for that, Paul.

      Delete
  10. ellie4:33 pm

    Hi, After mislaying my old and trusted jam making book I looked online and found this recipe. Really pleased with results and how easy the recipe was. Now.... do you have an equally easy way to make grape jelly?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Ellie... Glad you like the recipe. Why not try some of the other Allotment Heaven easy recipes by clicking the link in the first paragraph above.

      I'm sorry, but a recipe for grape jelly has never crossed my mind. There is a good and simple recipe at the at the BBC Good Food website you could use (http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/7606/grape-jelly). Hope this helps, John

      Delete
  11. Pectin in jam has a great effect on its thickness. There are numerous health benefits to it as well.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Anonymous5:25 pm

    Followed your recipe and although, as you say, jam a little runnier it is delicious. Grandchildren love it over icecream.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the positive comment. Spring rhubarb is almost ready to pick, and I'm still enjoying the jam from last year and have been throughout the winter. And you're right... it's a perfect accompaniment to ice-cream. Regards, John

      Delete
  13. Anonymous4:58 pm

    Can this jam be made using already stewed rhubarb if more sugar and lemon juice are added then all re boiled?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'd guess you'd need to reduce the boiling time to allow for the fact the rhubarb has already been stewed. I suggest not much reduction, though. Try 10 minutes. Thanks, John

      Delete
  14. Oonagh7:27 pm

    Thanks so much for this lovely recipe. I had never made jam but had some rhubarb to use from our plot & wanted a change from crumble. I used half the quantities & it turned out great - fruity, tangy & a lovely not-too-loose consistency - yum! I'll be exploring your blog for more ideas!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the positive feedback, Oonagh. I'm just building up to my annual jam making session to last me through to this time next year... just at the bottom of the last 2015 jar and starting to get withdrawal symptoms! Regards, John

      Delete
  15. I don't know if I've missed it in all the comments but I can't seem to find how much jam this recipe will make? I'm wondering how many jars will be needed for 4lbs of rhubarb?
    Thanks in advance :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi... The quantities in the recipe make about 8 standard jam jars of jam.

      Delete
  16. Looking forward to trying this recipe. Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's well worth the small effort for a whole year's supply of deliciously fruity rhubarb jam, Sue.

      Delete
  17. Is the jam supposed to be soft set or do I need to boil some more?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It doesn't really set at all. If you've boiled for long enough that the rhubarb is all mushy, that's fine. Regards, John

      Delete
  18. Anonymous2:48 pm

    can i add leaf gelatin to the jam to make it set a little better

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You could... but do you know what gelatin is made from? Boiled down animal bones, skin and connective tissue. Yuk!

      Delete
  19. Anonymous2:43 pm

    Hi John, just doing your receipe now. Do I need to put the rhubarb and sugar in the fridge overnight ?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, just leave in cool place overnight, not fridge.

      Delete

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