Sloe gin or vodka easy recipe

Autumn is the perfect time to make sloe gin or vodka. Hedgerows are full of ripe, juicy sloes and the delicious fruity liqueur will be ready in time for Christmas. So why not give it a go? It's so easy to make and you certainly won't regret it when, feet up in front of the fire with the wind and snow howling outside, you treat yourself to a warming tipple. Why not try one of the other Allotment Heaven easy recipes?

Equipment needed
2 litre preserving bottle such as show here
Weighing scales

Ingredients needed
1 litre bottle of gin or vodka (no need to buy an expensive brand!)
450 grams of sloes
250 grams of white sugar, whose purpose is not only to sweeten the liqueur but to also extract the maxium amount of juice from the sloes.



Method
1. A few days before you're ready to start put the sloes in a plastic bag and place them in a freezer. This will break the skins.
2. Let the sloes defrost before using.
3. Put the sloes, sugar and gin or vodka into the preserving bottle and seal.
4. Give the contents a thorough shake.
5. Shake the bottle every other day for a month.
6. Shake once a week for the second month.
7. When you're ready to drink (see below) strain clear the liquid into the 1 litre sterilised gin or vodka bottle.
8. Add more sugar if necessary according to preference.
9. The liqueur can be drunk from the third month onward, though will improve with age.
The left over sloes can be used to make jam.

30 comments:

  1. I don't drink but this sounds so tempting I might give it a try next year. It's such a beautiful colour in the jars.

    ReplyDelete
  2. another excellent use for the sloes after gin making at step 7 strain and put back in jar all the sloes and residue add the same amount of sugar as for the gin but top the jars up with the cheapest sherry you can buy repeat as for gin
    but sloe sherry is a amazing drink
    and i always add a teaspoon of ground almonds with the sugar to both the gin and sherry i do not know why but it gives the finished product a much smoother taste the old boyes in norfolk say the almond takes the bite out of the sloe and leaves the flavour

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That sounds about the best recycling suggestions I've ever heard. A sherry before Christmas dinner is just about the best taste ever... your recipe suggestion sounds even more tempting, Goriel. Many thanks.

      Delete
    2. What a great idea, I'm going to try this :-)

      Delete
    3. At a slight tangent, if you've made blackberry whisky by a similar method, don't throw the blackberries out after straining off the liquid - you can get excellent boozy pies and crumbles from them.

      Delete
    4. Blackberry whisky? BLACKBERRY WHISKY! How about sharing that recipe with us, WiseOwl. I'm a whisky lover so REALLY INTERESTED! Regards, John

      Delete
  3. Eleanor Lines11:59 am

    Thanks for this. Am considering switching to vodka instead of gin this year (as i have a bottle nearly full..). Any thoughts on the difference in flavour? I'm trying to anticipate it...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Eleanor... Both taste so intensely fruity it's hard to tell the difference. They're just delicious!

      Regards, John

      Delete
  4. Oh my sloe vodka is amazing....doing BlackBerry and strawberry vodka the same way enjoy x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the suggestions, Emma. They sound worth a try. I'll be out and about collecting sloes sometime in the next few days to start this year's batch ready for Christmas. The sloes are bigger than I've ever seen them this year. Thanks, John

      Delete
  5. can u use them when still hard?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not recommended, Cobweb. I doubt if the fruity taste will seep out into the vodka. Any sloes you collect now will be hard until the first frost. If you're in the south of England this might not happen until December or January. Just follow step 1 under 'Method' and put a bag of sloes in the freezer for a few days. Regards, John

      Delete
  6. Anonymous12:10 pm

    I made sloe vodka 2 yrs ago, I added almond essence to the brew, I don't drink alcohol myself but the smell was wonderful, it smelled like liquid bakewell tart, in the end I had to try a very small amount and it was lush, I have to say just that tiny tot made me tiddly, it went down very well as gifts and I have been pestered for more, so this year I am doing it again,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That sounds a great idea, just might try it. Thank you!

      Delete
  7. Where is the best place to store whilst making it ie warm or cool conditions? Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Normal room temperature is fine. Mine is currently stored in the dining room. Regards, John

      Delete
  8. Hi John, I have two kiln jars of sloe gin currently on the go which I made last month. Never tried doing this before so I wondered what is the optimum amount of time I should keep my sloes in the liquor? I have no intention of drinking the gin this year and would like to save it for next year so I can be very patient. Thanking you in advance :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Bex... Normally I keep mine going for a year and the end taste is wonderful. But this year I'm going to try drinking in the same year to see if there's much difference. Additionally, the sloes in Cambridgeshire have been bigger and more abundant than I've ever seen, so I'm hoping they're also more fruity.

      You can start and drink within three months. So I started in October, I've been shaking the bottle every day, and I'll strain and drink in time for this Christmas.

      Hope that helps. Regards, John

      Delete
    2. Thanks John, happy drinking :-)

      Delete
  9. Anonymous12:24 pm

    love this recipe.. have it saved and use it for gin and vodka.. just about to bottle up last years crop and make more

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Appreciate the positive feedback, and glad you're enjoying the recipe. My favourite sipping time is in the week before Xmas. Thanks, John

      Delete
  10. Not seen so many sloes in Hampshire this year but managed to pick enough for 1 batch of sloe vodka ! I used to make sloe wine that is lovely too !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think last year was so abundant with sloes, the bushes are having a rest year in 2016.

      Delete
  11. Last year my wife and I made vodka liqueur and it was great, but we let the mix mature in the refrigerator. It took forever for the sugar to dissolve.

    Earlier today, we made 8 1-liter bottles (latched like a canning jar) and placed them on a rack in our apartment's basement storage cage. Is there a danger of the bottles exploding from being at room temperature? T'would be a shame to lose any, not to mention damaging our neighbor's possessions. Thank you, John (from Denmark)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi John... I'm not surprised the sugar took so long to dissolve if you kept the mix in a fridge. Did you do that just to ensure no bacteria got into the liquid and spoiled it?

      There's no fermentation with making a liqueur, since it's purely the absorption of flavouring by the alcohol, so I don't think there's a risk of explosion at room temperature.

      Regards, John (And thank you for adding your location... adds interest to the comments).

      Delete
    2. Hi John, thanks for the quick reply!

      We kept last years batch in the fridge as my wife had read to do so in one of her old Danish recipe books. I questioned this, but as we all know, "choose your battles"...

      I picked another 1½ kilos of berries yesterday to ensure that the bottle rack was fully loaded and look forward to making some marmelade from the steeped fruit. Sounds like a fantastic topping for home made ice cream - thanks for the tip!

      Cheers, John

      Delete
  12. Can i do anything with baccardi, we seem to have about 5bottles in thedrinks cupboard

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'd just substitute the gin or vodka in the recipe with bacardi and the results should be fine, Shirley. If anything, the outcome might be better, given the warming nature of rum. Thanks, John

      Delete
  13. Anonymous11:07 am

    Iam guessing as it isnt stated that the sugar is split equally between each jar

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not sure what you mean. The recipe is for one 2 litre preserving bottle. If you use one bottle, all the sugar goes in that bottle. If you use two bottles and twice the ingredients, you put 250 grams of sugar in each bottle.

      Delete

You might also like...

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...